Out of the Void Posters
Out of the Void Poster by Bebops

I am constantly astonished and entranced by the myriad forms of life on this planet. To quote one of my very favorite authors, Annie Dillard, in
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, "the creator has pizzazz".

I hope to display a variety of animal images on this blog to delight us all. I have created many products featuring wildlife and pets for my Zazzle stores, Bebop's Place and Bebop's Weddings, using my original photographs and designs. I am also constantly amazed at the gorgeous animal products available from the rest of the Zazzle community. I am hoping others will enjoy this blog and even be moved to purchase some of these lovely items for gifts or just for the pleasure of having such beauty around.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Get Well Soon - Stellar Group, Tarantula Nebula Cards

A gorgeous something for Valentine's day to express your love and featuring a cute animal. Click to see, personalize and buy.

tagged with: astronomy, get well soon, speedy recovery, hurry home, stellar nursery, r136, tarantula nebula, amazing hubble images, star galaxies, hrbstslr dorneblmc, massive stars, large magellanic cloud, star cluster, 30 doradus nebula

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our local galactic neighborhood. The massive, young stellar grouping, called R136, is only a few million years old and resides in the 30 Doradus (or Tarantula) Nebula, a turbulent star-birth region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.
There is no known star-forming region in our galaxy as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. The image, taken in ultraviolet, visible, and red light by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, spans about 100 light-years.
The movement of the LMC around the Milky Way may have triggered the massive cluster's formation in several ways. The gravitational tug of the Milky Way and the companion Small Magellanic Cloud may have compressed gas in the LMC. Also, the pressure resulting from the LMC plowing through the Milky Way's halo may have compressed gas in the satellite. The cluster is a rare, nearby example of the many super star clusters that formed in the distant, early universe, when star birth and galaxy interactions were more frequent.
The LMC is located 170,000 light-years away and is a member of the Local Group of Galaxies, which also includes the Milky Way. The Hubble observations were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen.
more items with this image
more items in the Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series

image code: dorneblmc

Image credit: Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3

»visit the HightonRidley store for more designs and products like this
The Zazzle guarantee: We promise 100% satisfaction. If you don't absolutely love it, we'll take it back!

No comments:

Post a Comment